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Queen Elizabeth II shares rare home video footage of ‘precious moments’

Placeholder while article actions are loadingLONDON — Queen Elizabeth II...

Food banks are early warning systems for emerging food crises, but also a key solution

With the recent World Economic Forum in Davos and the...
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Queen Elizabeth II shares rare home video footage of ‘precious moments’

Placeholder while article actions are loadingLONDON — Queen Elizabeth II has been in the limelight for a lifetime and is one of the most photographed people in the world. This weekend Brits will be treated to rare home movies and never-before-seen footage – much shot by herself...

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Queen Elizabeth II shares rare home video footage of ‘precious moments’

Placeholder while article actions are loadingLONDON — Queen Elizabeth II has been in the limelight for a lifetime...

Food banks are early warning systems for emerging food crises, but also a key solution

With the recent World Economic Forum in Davos and the G7 summit, there are already calls for governments...

Former Russian state TV journalist: ‘Turn off the TV’

Zhanna Agalakova quit her job in March due to the invasion of Ukraine and is now in hiding. Source...

Banks must support growth, remain vigilant for slippage: RBI report

The Reserve Bank said on Friday that banks must support growth while being vigilant about the lending behavior...

Kremlin: Kremlin accuses Ukraine of ‘conflicting’ statements over peace talks – Times of India

The Kremlin said on Friday it blamed Ukraine for the freeze on peace talks between the two countries,...

Home to the world’s largest nuclear power plant, now a vote for Japan’s nuclear path

<!-- -->This election points to an easy victory for incumbent governor Hanazumi.Kashiwazaki: Three days before the vote to...

Stock Futures Rise Slightly as S&P 500 Aims for a Winning Week

Stock futures were slightly higher on Friday as the S&P 500 attempted to break a seven-week loss streak.Futures...

Russia advances in east as Ukrainians warn of ‘tough month ahead’

Ukrainian troops have been overtaken by Russia after the Kremlin withdrew troops from the Kiev region, an adviser...

Five things we need to achieve as the environmental movement turns 50

Now is the time to reinvent our economic system, reinvent the structures that have caused environmental degradation, and...

Sri Lanka: Sri Lanka allows private companies to import fuel: Minister – Times of India

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka's government has authorized private companies to import fuel, Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekera said Friday, a...

US and Taiwan could talk about closer economic ties ‘within weeks’

The new discussions will "explore concrete ways to deepen the trade and investment relationship between the US and...

As UN rights chief visits China, some fear she will be part of the spider

The news was featured prominently in Chinese state media: the United Nations human rights chief had met with...

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Queen Elizabeth II shares rare home video footage of ‘precious moments’



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LONDON — Queen Elizabeth II has been in the limelight for a lifetime and is one of the most photographed people in the world. This weekend Brits will be treated to rare home movies and never-before-seen footage – much shot by herself and her family – in a documentary airing Sunday on the BBC to celebrate 70 years of her reign.

Elizabeth, 96, is seen as a baby being pushed into a pram by her mother and later playing with her father, King George VI, in Windsor as she falls from a chair in the garden. In another clip, she wades through lakes at Balmoral with her sister, Margaret, and a corgi. The film also shows the young princess gazing fondly at her engagement ring shortly after Prince Philip proposed to her.

“Cameras have always been a part of our lives,” said Elizabeth in a message recorded at Windsor Castle for the 75-minute BBC film “Elizabeth: The Unseen Queen”.

“Like many families, my parents wanted to capture our precious moments together. And when it was our turn with our own family, we did the same,” she told the BBC.

“I have always enjoyed capturing family moments,” continues the monarch. “Private photos can often show the fun behind the formality.”

Elizabeth has appeared less in public in recent months, with health problems ranging from a sprained back to a covid episode. An overnight stay in a hospital last year also raised serious health concerns for the non-peer. Since then, she has made a number of virtual appearances and has been seen in public with a walking stick, with Buckingham Palace citing sporadic “mobility issues.”

Earlier in May, she missed the opening of parliament, one of the most important dates on the royal calendar, leaving behind her son and heir, Prince Charles.

However, ahead of her platinum anniversary celebrations, the queen attended a royal horse show, where she smiled brightly and waved to the crowd before receiving a standing ovation. Elizabeth also appeared for the opening of London’s newest tube line, named after her, which aims to transform the city for commuters and visitors alike.

The platinum anniversary celebrations will last four days from Thursday, and Union Jack flags and buntings already adorn train stations and parks as people rush to buy memorabilia for the impending pomp. Thousands of people are expected to flock to Buckingham Palace to watch parades and a concert, while trying to catch a glimpse of the monarch and her family on the balcony.

The BBC film will be shown in the UK this weekend, but it’s unclear if it will be shown in the US at a later date.

“The production team had no idea how special it was to have access to this very personal archive,” said Claire Popplewell, creative director of BBC Studios Events Productions, according to the broadcaster. “Allowing the Queen to tell us her own story is the heart of this film.”

In the documentary, Elizabeth reflects on the photos and images: “You always hope that future generations will find them interesting, and maybe be surprised that you too were once young.”

Karla Adam contributed to this report.



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Food banks are early warning systems for emerging food crises, but also a key solution


Community members in Sowripalayam, outside Coimbatore, receive a meal from No Food Waste, a GFN-supported food bank in India. Credit: The Global Food Banking Network/Narayana Swamy Subbaraman
  • Opinion by Lisa Moon (Chicago, United States
  • Inter Press Service

Add to that the ubiquitous effects of climate change, and the result is what the United Nations calls a “perfect storm” that risks putting one-fifth of the world’s population — a staggering 1.7 billion people — into poverty and hunger.

This number feels so huge it’s almost unthinkable, let alone possible to accept. And of course, the escalating global food crisis will not affect everyone equally.

Recent feedback from food bank leaders around the world already reflects the reality ahead. Because food banks, especially in emerging and emerging markets, are the first (or sometimes only) port of call for people suffering from hunger, they provide a window to understand the full extent of the coming food crisis: an early warning system of the pressures on our food systems.

The Global Food Banking Network works with member food banks in 44 countries, many of them in Africa, Asia and Latin America already reporting that higher food prices are contributing to an increase in demand for emergency food aid.

For example, a partner food bank in Ecuador, Banco de Alimentos Quito, has reported a 50 percent increase in demand for services, while another partner, India Food Banking Network, has warned that the number of people asking for food has recently doubled.

If no more is done — and soon — these numbers are just the tip of the iceberg. Tragically, as demand increases at many food banks, supplies donated to food banks often dwindle.

These food banks in Ecuador and India — and others across the network — are reporting declines in product donations of up to 50 percent. Banco de Alimentos Quito and Banco de Alimentos Honduras, both of which regularly reclaim fresh produce directly from farmers to distribute to those suffering from hunger, signal that planting schedules have been scrapped because farmers are unable to get significant inputs.

In short, there is less product available to donate due to increasing need and smaller, less reliable returns.

With the recent World Economic Forum in Davos and the G7 summit, there are already calls for governments and business leaders to invest more in hunger and food aid. This is a crucial first step, but investments will only be as effective as the implementation mechanisms to realize them.

Here too, food banks can intervene effectively and directly. As food banks respond to community food needs even in less precarious times, they are already well positioned to respond to crises by scaling up in times of scarcity and distributing food when conventional supply chains are undermined.

The COVID-19 pandemic is already a prime example, with global food banks serving 40 million people by 2020, up 132 percent from the previous year. And because food banks are community-oriented and community-led, they can understand and adapt to local needs quite quickly, acting as first-line responders when a crisis occurs.

Responses to the global hunger crisis must include recognition of the critical role food banks play. They will take on a greater role in the coming months and will play a vital role in meeting the rapidly increasing demand for food aid.

However, if the global community steps forward and further supports the value of these assets, the impact of food banks could become too great. And an outrageous response is exactly what this coming crisis requires.

IPS UN Office


Follow IPS News UN Bureau on Instagram

© Inter Press Service (2022) — All rights reservedOriginal source: Inter Press Service



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Former Russian state TV journalist: ‘Turn off the TV’


Zhanna Agalakova quit her job in March due to the invasion of Ukraine and is now in hiding.

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Banks must support growth, remain vigilant for slippage: RBI report



The Reserve Bank said on Friday that banks must support growth while being vigilant about the lending behavior of entities whose loans were restructured during the pandemic period to stem slippage.

Banks had extended the moratorium on loan repayments and restructured advances to businesses to help them combat the impact of the COVID pandemic and subsequent lockdowns to stem the spread of the virus.

In its annual report released on Friday, the RBI said the banking sector has witnessed improved financial parameters despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

“However, vigilance should be placed on the credit behavior of the restructured advances and the possibility of greater slippage due to sectors relatively more exposed to the pandemic,” it said.

With support measures being lifted, some of the restructured accounts may face solvency problems, and the impact on bank balance sheets will become more apparent in the coming quarters, the report said.

Prudence ensures proactive recognition of non-viable accounts to trigger timely resolution, it added.

“As the economy recovers and credit demand rises, banks will need to focus in the future on supporting credit growth while being vigilant about evolving risks.

“It is necessary to ensure that new slippages are stopped and that bank balance sheets are strengthened to prevent future stress build-up,” according to the Reserve Bank’s annual report for the year 2021-22.

It went on to say that NBFCs and urban cooperative banks (UCBs) should consider weaknesses wherever they are in their balance sheets and ensure robust asset-liability management, in addition to improving the quality of their loan portfolios.

The central bank also said that in order to further strengthen the regulatory and supervisory framework, several measures are expected to be taken for banks and NBFCs in the current fiscal year.

Turning to the overall economic situation, the Reserve Bank said fiscal year 2020-21 presented many challenges, but a recovery is underway despite headwinds.

The future growth path will be determined by addressing supply-side bottlenecks, calibrating monetary policy to bring inflation within target while supporting growth and targeted fiscal policy support to aggregate demand, it added.



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Kremlin: Kremlin accuses Ukraine of ‘conflicting’ statements over peace talks – Times of India


The Kremlin said on Friday it blamed Ukraine for the freeze on peace talks between the two countries, saying it was unclear what Kiev wanted.
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters: “The Ukrainian leadership is constantly making contradictory statements. Because of this, we cannot fully understand what the Ukrainian side wants.”
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy previously said he had repeatedly tried to organize a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin to end the war, but that Russia did not seem ready for serious peace talks.
“There are things to discuss with the Russian leader. I’m not telling you that … our people are eager (for me) to talk to him, but we have to face the reality of what we are going through, Zelenskyy said in a speech to an Indonesian think tank.
“What do we want from this meeting? … We want our lives back … We want to reclaim the life of a sovereign country in its own territory,” he said.
The last known personal peace negotiations were on March 29. The contacts continued remotely for a while, but both sides now say they have stopped.


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Home to the world’s largest nuclear power plant, now a vote for Japan’s nuclear path


This election points to an easy victory for incumbent governor Hanazumi.

Kashiwazaki:

Three days before the vote to elect their region’s next governor, a handful of residents of Kashiwazaki, a sleepy coastal town in northern Japan, stood by a road to hear the race’s contender warn of the dangers of nuclear power.

Four years ago, Naomi Katagiri, who is challenging the sitting Sunday in Niigata Prefecture Governor elections, might have drawn a larger, more observant crowd.

Back then, when they last elected their governor, the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster was still fresh in voters’ minds and policy towards what was a major source of power for Japan was central to a city that was home to is the world’s largest nuclear power plant, the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant, which is operated by Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco), owner of Fukushima Daiichi.

Today, voters have other concerns.

According to a recent survey by the newspaper Niigata Nippo, the economic pain from rising energy costs and the COVID-19 pandemic is at the center of attention, and nuclear power ranks only fifth among key issues for voters.

In the 2018 race, this was the main problem.

As the war in Ukraine and a weaker yen hit households, the vote in Niigata will be closely monitored as a gauge of the willingness of Japanese voters to embrace nuclear power again.

Dozens of reactors in Japan were shut down after the Fukushima disaster, caused by a huge earthquake and tsunami. Only 10 are now operational, compared to 54 before the Fukushima disaster.

Proponents of restarting factories in Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) as soon as possible say a clear victory for the incumbent governor, Hideyo Hanazumi, whom they support could speed things up.

Polls point to an easy win for Hanazumi.

Poor Japan imports nearly all of its fuel, and a ban on Russian oil and coal as part of sanctions for the invasion of Ukraine has encouraged pro-nuclear lawmakers to take their case.

“We want to use his win as an opportunity to accelerate the restart across the country,” a senior LDP lawmaker told Reuters on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the case.

Political sources said efforts to get nuclear power plants back to work are likely to get underway in earnest after a July senate election.

The government plans to increase the nuclear contribution in its energy mix to 20-22% by 2030. Aware of security and Tepco’s repeated violations of compliance since the 2011 disaster, Kishida said restarts would only take place after proper security clearance and with public approval.

City in decline

The Kashiwazaki plant supplied power to the Tokyo area 265 km (165 miles) to the south, and the impact of the idling is clearly visible.

Many businesses are closed on the city’s main shopping street. ‘For rent’ signs are common.

A few years ago, major supermarket chain Ito-Yokado withdrew after decades and dealt a major blow to the city, according to residents. Three multi-storey hotels overlook the central station, but their rooms are mostly empty.

The city’s population has shrunk by 12% since the nuclear power plant was shut down to less than 80,000. The city says its economy shrank by 11% between 2012 and 2019.

People on both sides of the nuclear debate say voices cannot ignore the economic slump.

“The voters’ priority should now be economic policy, not nuclear energy,” Shigeo Makino, head of Niigata’s largest labor organization, Rengo Niigata, told Reuters this week.

The union backs Hanazumi after supporting his anti-nuclear opponent in 2018, citing his track record on the labor front.

Yet the resentment against core company Tepco runs deep. Nuclear regulators objected to a Tepco plan to restart Kashiwazaki-Kariwa last year after finding that insufficient security measures had been taken, including the misuse of identity cards.

Hanazumi himself has tried to avoid the nuclear issue and when asked about it, he reiterated the government’s statement that safety is the priority.

Even anti-nuclear activists admit that their favorite candidate’s warnings about the dangers of nuclear power plants have largely fallen on deaf ears.

“A lot of people used to think nuclear energy was dangerous,” said Takashi Miyazaki, a former Kashiwazaki councilor with the anti-nuclear Japanese Communist Party.

“But a desperate desire to do something about this city’s economic decline may have helped spread the feeling that nuclear restart might be the quick answer.”

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and has been published from a syndicated feed.)



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Stock Futures Rise Slightly as S&P 500 Aims for a Winning Week


Stock futures were slightly higher on Friday as the S&P 500 attempted to break a seven-week loss streak.

Futures on the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 34 points, or 0.1%. S&P 500 futures and Nasdaq 100 futures gained 0.3% and 0.4%, respectively.

The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq are on track to close the week higher. The Dow is up 4.4%, the S&P 500 is up 4% and the Nasdaq Composite is up 3.4% this week. Some of that gain came Thursday, as all three averages rose as strong retail earnings lifted sentiment.

Still, the averages are well off their highs, with the Nasdaq Composite firmly in bear market territory and the S&P 500 briefly dipping more than 20% below its record last week.

The Nasdaq is down 27.6% from its record after Thursday’s close, while the S&P 500 and Dow are down 15.8% and 11.7% respectively.

“We think there’s a good chance of some more power here. This is kind of a classic bear market rally or bounce off the bottom,” Troy Gayeski, chief market strategist for FS Investments, told CNBC’s “Closing Bell: Overtime” Monday. “Inflation expectations have been skipped recently.”

Investors continued to analyze retail earnings on Friday. Ulta Beauty shares rose about 8% in the premarket after the company reported better-than-expected quarterly results, while Gap fell nearly 20% after lowering earnings estimates.

Stock Selection and Investment Trends from CNBC Pro:

A slew of data will be released Friday, including personal income, consumer spending and top personal consumer spending.



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Russia advances in east as Ukrainians warn of ‘tough month ahead’



Ukrainian troops have been overtaken by Russia after the Kremlin withdrew troops from the Kiev region, an adviser to Zelensky said.

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Five things we need to achieve as the environmental movement turns 50


Now is the time to reinvent our economic system, reinvent the structures that have caused environmental degradation, and create a global society that gives everyone the opportunity to lead healthy and fair lives.

When world leaders look for reasons to commit to real change, all they need to do is look at the many crises occurring around the world.

The war in Ukraine is causing death and misery, but also an ever-growing energy and food crisis that we have created by relying on gas, oil and monocrops. The world is still dealing with the ongoing hangover from the pandemic. Meanwhile, climate change, wildlife and biodiversity loss, pollution and waste – the triple planetary crisis – are already causing pain, ill health and financial ruin, with the potential for much more to come. It is obvious that we have misled our societies and economies. Something has to change, starting with Stockholm+50.

Stockholm+50 takes place 50 years after the original Stockholm Conference on the Human Environment, which many consider to be the starting point of the modern environmental movement. Of course, the original conference wasn’t just about the environment. It was about how environmental damage harms development and causes poverty, and how poverty alleviation is key to tackling environmental damage.

Stockholm+50 is not just about the environment either. It’s about how nurturing the environment can reduce poverty and help the world achieve its sustainable development goals. So now is the time to envision and create a fairer economic system, reinvent the structures that have caused environmental degradation and create a global society that gives everyone the opportunity to enjoy a healthy and fair to lead life. Here are five ideas on how we can do this over the next 50 years – starting with the political commitment to act at Stockholm+50.

Get to know the energy transition

We cannot continue with fossil fuels, but we also need to tackle energy poverty. 759 million people have no access to electricity and 2.6 billion people depend on polluting stoves and fuels. The answer is to move to renewable energy, along with greater energy efficiency and expanded access to energy. The cost of renewable energy is lower than the cost of fossil fuels. However, just because proven technologies exist doesn’t mean the market will respond. Only good government policy and much more investment will move the markets. Likewise, countries have different types of resources, be it wind, solar, geothermal or hydropower. It’s about horses for courses – supported by international cooperation and multilateralism to connect systems and create cross-border transmission lines, as well as off-grid energy solutions.

Move from the ‘cowboy economy’ to the ‘spaceman economy’

Economist Kenneth Boulding pioneered these concepts in 1966. The idea is to stop acting like cowboys in the Wild West, who would deplete an area’s resources before moving on, and act like astronauts on a spaceship with limited resources. to behave. After all, no one leaves this planet – except for a few billionaires, and even they only dive into space for a little jaunt.

How do we do this? Companies can report nature-related risks and take action (more on that later). Consumers can make decisions based on the impact their purchases have on the natural world that supports them. We can invest more in nature. It is critical that the incorporation of nature into any economic decision makes us stewards of the environment – recognizing that the health of the economy depends on the health of nature.

Universally recognize the human right to a clean and healthy environment

The right to a clean and healthy environment is important because it forces governments, companies and institutions to respect, protect and fulfill that right. Enforcing this right could change so much. It could reduce pollution, which affects human health and is a significant cost to health systems. It could protect environmentalists and indigenous peoples from persecution. It could make our cities more livable by creating ’20-minute neighborhoods’ where residents can quickly walk or cycle to all their basic needs. Guaranteeing the right to a clean and healthy environment could change everything.

Use digital technologies and open data to enable environmental sustainability

Digital technologies can empower people, governments and businesses to make more sustainable choices. This requires making environmental data open and accessible as a basis for decision-making. New digital product passports will be needed to calculate the environmental footprint of products and services in their supply chains. Major investments will be needed to ensure that everyone benefits from digital technologies. Ultimately, it will ask us to unite the digital transition and the sustainability transition.

Create financial systems aligned with the health of the planet

Financial systems should only fund initiatives that benefit the planet and by extension humanity. Central banks and regulators should have a mandate for planetary and climate stability, because without planetary stability you cannot have financial stability. Regulators are beginning to understand that climate risks create financial risks. We are in an early stage and disclosure of climate-related financial data is increasing. What we really need is for regulators to ask market participants to set net-zero targets – with real plans and real timelines. And this isn’t just about carbon. At the same time, targets for “no net loss” of biodiversity and “no environmental pollution” should be integrated into the financial system.

These ideas, and many more that will be shared in Stockholm+50, can transform our societies and economies to live in harmony with nature. This will not end the war, but it will reduce the triggers for war by creating wealth for many more people. This will not end pandemics, but it will reduce the risks of them occurring and their impact. This will not create a world where everyone can have what they want whenever they want – but it will reduce poverty, create greater equality and greater opportunity, and allow future generations to inherit a living planet. As the Stockholm Declaration said, humans are both creatures and transformers of the environment. It is now up to us to shape our societies and economies so that the environment remains healthy, vibrant and able to support us all.

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of Al Jazeera.



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Sri Lanka: Sri Lanka allows private companies to import fuel: Minister – Times of India


COLOMBO: Sri Lanka’s government has authorized private companies to import fuel, Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekera said Friday, a move aimed at easing the burden on state-run fuel retailer Ceylon Petroleum Corporation (CPC) that is in need of money.
The severe depreciation of the Sri Lankan rupee against the US dollar and rising world crude oil prices following the ongoing conflict in Ukraine have been some of the reasons why the state-owned company has struggled to import fuel. “Approval has been given to all Private Bunker Fuel Operators to import and supply diesel and fuel oil needs from industries to operate their generators and machines,” Wijesekera said in a tweet.
“This will ease the burden on CPC and bulk service stations. The meeting took place yesterday,” he added.
In April, the Sri Lankan cabinet agreed to amend the Petroleum Products Act and make provisions for licensing “duly identified parties” to import fuel, which will end an import monopoly of the CPC, according to the online business and political news portal EconomyNext.
The Sri Lankan government on Tuesday raised petrol prices by 24.3 percent and diesel by 38.4 percent, a record increase in fuel prices during the country’s worst economic crisis due to the shortage of foreign exchange reserves.
With the second fuel price hike since April 19, the most commonly used Octane 92 gasoline would now cost 420 rupees ($1.17) and diesel 400 rupees ($1.11) per liter, a record high.
The decision to raise the price of gasoline Octane 92 by 24.3 percent or 82 rupees and diesel by 38.4 percent or 111 rupees per liter was taken by the CPC.
Sri Lanka has also hired France-based financial and legal consultancies Lazard and Clifford Chance LLP to assist in debt restructuring as the country is on the brink of bankruptcy.
A crippling shortage of foreign reserves has led to long lines for fuel, cooking gas and other necessities, while power cuts and rising food prices have wreaked havoc on people.
On Thursday, Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe met with the presidents and top management of all state and private banks in the country and briefed them on issues such as the dollar deficit and credit expansion, as well as the amount of savings, media reports said.
Sri Lanka is experiencing its worst economic crisis since independence from Britain in 1948, which also sparked a political crisis.
The nearly bankrupt country, with an acute currency crisis that resulted in foreign debt default, announced last month that it is suspending repayment of nearly $7 billion for this year of the roughly $25 billion owed through 2026.
Sri Lanka’s total external debt is $51 billion.
The financial crisis has led to an acute shortage of essential items such as food, medicine, cooking gas and other fuel, toilet paper and even matches, with Sri Lankans being forced for months in rows of hours outside shops to buy fuel and cooking gas.
Protesters have been occupying the entrance to President Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s office for nearly 50 days, demanding his resignation.
The brother of the president and former prime minister Mahinda Rajapaksa resigned earlier this month after nationwide violence when his supporters attacked peaceful protesters.


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